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Thorobred

Maker: Waterman.

This is a sadly under-documented pen, and I suggest taking an even larger grain of salt with what follows that with most of my Waterman profiles.  Thorobreds appear in the low end of Waterman’s line-up towards the end of the 1930′s and disappear again in about 1940.  They’re very similar to the Stalwart and Dauntless models that appear shortly after their departure, differing mainly in the older style of clip and the presence of an ink window in the section.  It appears to be a successor to the No. 3 (which is entirely outside the early numbering system) and may be either a successor to or renaming of the 301.

The lack of documentary evidence is vexing, since Thorobreds tend to have extremely attractive colour patterns.  Performance-wise, they are all one expects from a vintage Waterman.

Production Run: c. 1936 – c. 1940 (if they are a rebranding of the 301, they may have a much narrower window than this, as the 301 appears in ads from 1939).

Cost When New: $3.00, in an ad from 1940 (for modern value, try this calculator).  I’ve had it pointed out to me that there was a “De Luxe” version at $3.50, which (I make an assumption) likely had gold rather than chrome plating.

Size: 12.6 cm long capped, 15.6 cm posted, 12.0 cm uncapped. There was a shorter ladies’ version which I have not had a chance to examine.

Point: 14k gold.

Body: Celluloid.

Filler: Lever, capacity approx.  1.0 ml.

Waterman Thorobred – the fine inclusion colour is not limited to this model, but is more likely to appear in it

 

 

If you are relying on the preceding information to win a bet or impress a teacher, you should read the site’s scholarly caveat. Remember, this is the internet, and it’s full of bad information.

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  1. Art Meets Palomino Luxury Notebook | CED NOCON

    [...] is a pen & ink artwork produced on a Palomino Luxury  Notebook using a vintage 1930s Waterman Thorobred fountain pen and J. Herbin’s Café des Îsles fountain pen [...]

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